Tracks Of The Week

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Join us as we stride with purpose through rock’s bountiful orchard to pick six of the tastiest riff-orientated offerings from the vine…

GNARWOLVES – The Waiting Line
Taken from the Brighton-based punks’ forthcoming EP, Adolescence, this track is a short and not-so-sweet blast of gritty and gravelled yet melodic punk. Apparently fashioned after the DC punk sound, it shows just how the three-piece are continuing to evolve and, frankly, get better and better.

PANIC! AT THE DISCO – Victorious
Never ones to be afraid of changing up their style, Panic! At The Disco’s new single sounds like a cross between Electric Six and The Village People. Taken from their forthcoming fifth album, it sees the band – of which frontman Brendon Urie is the only original member – camp it up with this celebratory party anthem.

BOSTON MANOR – Trapped Nerve
Hailing from Blackpool, Boston Manor make catchy and impassioned music that straddles the line between pop-punk and indie rock. Which is to say this track is urgent, raw and full of nervous energy. If the rest of their forthcoming album is anywhere near this good, we’re in for a treat.

MAYDAY PARADE – Letting Go
Florida emo types Mayday Parade have always had a soft spot for, well, soft songs, but Letting Go might just be their most tender yet. Granted, it does build into a bit of a midway crescendo, but on the whole this is a pure power ballad through and through.

WAX IDOLS – I’m Not Going
Collect Records, the label run by Geoff Rickly (Thursday/No Devotion), has had a pretty terrible week with the revelations about the label’s investor, but that doesn’t change just how immense their roster is. Wax Idols are no exception, and this sultry, sassy and sinister song is right out of a beautiful 1980s nightmare.

ALGIERS – And When You Fall
It’s punk, Jim, but not as we know it. As this song perfectly demonstrates, Atlanta’s Algiers fuse gospel with post-punk to create a politically-charged and edgy sound that seeks to break all musical conventions. Powerful yet understated, this song captures the four-piece in all their unsettling, belligerent glory.