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Stones are better than ever - but don’t know why

The Rolling Stones are better live than they’ve ever been, says Ronnie Wood – but he can’t explain it.

The veteran outfit are gearing up for a US tour later this month, set to include tracks they haven’t played in years.

In a Twitter Q&A featuring all four members, Wood says: “We are better live now. I don’t know what’s happened.

“I’m going to enjoy the next stage of rehearsals we’re in now. They’re fun, believe me, and the music’s high quality. We’re going to explode one day, I think.”

Asked to describe his career in one word, he replies: “Fun!”

Mick Jagger reveals he begins practicing his singing a month before hitting the road. “After a few weeks I do karaoke,” he says, “But not in a smoke-filled room.”

Responding to a question about pre-show nerves he explains: “I don’t really get nervous, I get excited. Before the first show of a tour sometimes I get anxious. Anything can go wrong, there’s things than can happen. But I’m not really nervous.”

Keith Richards is asked to reveal the secret of immortality, and replies: “I ain’t there yet. So far so good! A clean and healthy life, plenty of exercise, go to church on Sunday.”

Charlie Watts, asked if he’s tired of seeing Jagger’s rear end after decades behind the drumkit, replies: “No. One of the finest views in the country.”

The Stones will re-release 1971 album Sticky Fingers next month.

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Martin Kielty

Not only is one-time online news editor Martin an established rock journalist and drummer, but he’s also penned several books on music history, including SAHB Story: The Tale of the Sensational Alex Harvey Band (opens in new tab), a band he once managed, and the best-selling Apollo Memories (opens in new tab) about the history of the legendary and infamous Glasgow Apollo. Martin has written for Classic Rock and Prog and at one time had written more articles for Louder than anyone else (we think he's second now). He’s appeared on TV and when not delving intro all things music, can be found travelling along the UK’s vast canal network.