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Slipknot sick of censorship

Slipknot percussionist Chris Fehn says he’s tired of his band’s lyrics being censored for broadcast on TV and radio.

He believes the laws that make it necessary for acts to provide alternative versions of strongly-worded songs are only in place because control freaks want them to be.

And he argues there are much worse things in the world than heavy language.

Fehn tells Rock Sins: “There’s so many songs that they’ll blip. I hate that. The worst is when they redo it with a different word.

“I’m like, ‘Come on, man.’ Even with the internet and how exposed kids are to things in this world? To me it’s the least of the problems we have.

“But I guess that’s the world we live in. It’s just control – people want control.”

Slipknot recently completed their first UK tour with their replacement bassist and drummer, following the 2010 death of Paul Gray and the 2013 dismissal of Joey Jordison.

Fehn says of the latest additions: “They’re doing their job, and hopefully they get out of it what they need to get out of it. And the seven of us are actually closer than we’ve been in a long time. It’s a good thing.”

Asked whether the new duo will be offered the chance to become fully-fledged members, he says: “I don’t know. We haven’t gotten that far yet.”

Slipknot have just announced a run of US shows with Lamb Of God, Bullet For My Valentine and Motionless In White.

Martin Kielty

Not only is one-time online news editor Martin an established rock journalist and drummer, but he’s also penned several books on music history, including SAHB Story: The Tale of the Sensational Alex Harvey Band (opens in new tab), a band he once managed, and the best-selling Apollo Memories (opens in new tab) about the history of the legendary and infamous Glasgow Apollo. Martin has written for Classic Rock and Prog and at one time had written more articles for Louder than anyone else (we think he's second now). He’s appeared on TV and when not delving intro all things music, can be found travelling along the UK’s vast canal network.