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Sid Wilson's old mask is now an animatronic puppet that sings along to Slipknot onstage and it's creepy as hell

Slipknot's Sid Wilson and his old mask
(Image credit: Slipknot)

Off the back of Slipknot's new album announcement for The End, So Far, which saw the Iowan nine also reveal that the majority of the band would be getting new masks, Sid Wilson has already found a use for his old one in the form of a freaky stage prop.

The Slipknot DJ has turned his old mask into a moving animatronic head, which sings along with the band while they perform. 

Slipknot uploaded a video of the mask onto their Instagram account showing the robot in action. It's seriously cool, but in no doubt also a little bit creepy.

The End, So Far will arrive via Roadrunner Records on September 30. To accompany announcement, the band also dropped their new single, The Dying Song (Time To Sing).

Speaking at a show at the Hills Of Rock festival in Plovdiv, Bulgaria on July 21, frontman Corey Taylor clarified the meaning behind the new album's title, explaining that it doesn't actually mean that Slipknot will be parting ways as a band as the moniker suggests, but rather, that they're moving into a new era.

"I'll tell you what, some of you might have heard the news that Slipknot has a new album coming out very, very soon. The name of that album is called The End, So Far" he says.

"And for those doomsday motherfuckers who think that Slipknot are gonna break up, that is not the case. This simply represents the end of one moment and the beginning of the rest of our fucking lives. Do you understand what I'm fucking saying to you out there?"

Produced by Slipknot and Joe Barresi (Kyuss, The Bronx), The End, So Far will feature 12 tracks, including 2021 single The Chapeltown Rag. The album is now available to pre-order.

Check out the mask below:

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Liz Scarlett
Liz Scarlett

Liz works on keeping the Louder sites up to date with the latest news from the world of rock and metal. Prior to joining Louder as a full time staff writer, she completed a Diploma with the National Council for the Training of Journalists and received a First Class Honours Degree in Popular Music Journalism. She enjoys writing about anything from neo-glam rock to stoner, doom and progressive metal, and loves celebrating women in music. '10 bands that rip off Black Sabbath but get away with it' is her favourite article she's written with Louder so far. When not writing, Liz enjoys various creative endeavours such as graphic design, as well as reading about rock’n’roll history, art and magic.