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AC/DC fans turn up in their thousands at unique Highway To Hell celebration

(Image credit: Paul Kane - Getty)

Yesterday, a 10km stretch of the busy Canning Highway in Perth, Australia, was closed to traffic to allow a special AC/DC celebration to take place.

News of the event – which closed out the annual Perth Festival – first came to light in October last year, and was organised as a tribute to Bon Scott and the Aussie rockers.

The free event, suitably titled Highway To Hell, saw a wide range of artists, from AC/DC tribute bands to the Perth Symphony Orchestra, play a selection of the band’s classic tracks from the backs of a convoy of flatbed trucks and trailers.

ABC report that an estimated 150,000 people lined the route between Applecross and Fremantle, 40 years to the day since Scott’s ashes were interred at Fremantle Cemetery.

Before the convoy began its journey, an air guitar world record was set when more than 3500 people rocked out to Highway To Hell – with the mass of metalheads led by Australian air guitar champ Alex Roberts.

Announcing the event last year, organisers said: “We’re reclaiming the iconic Canning Highway and turning it into the world’s longest stage for a day!

“Bring the family and join us as we celebrate our city and its connection to iconic Aussie band AC/DC. From the Raffles Hotel to the Old Fremantle Traffic Bridge, we’re closing the road to create a musical event that will have everyone singing along.

"Taking inspiration from the AC/DC song of the same name and Bon Scott’s connection to the area we’re paying homage to Highway To Hell."

Meanwhile, rumours surrounding the highly anticipated new AC/DC album continue to build, with former Twisted Sister frontman Dee Snider recently revealing that AC/DC’s Brian Johnson had told him about the band’s future plans.