Skip to main content

The 10 best Eagles songs, as chosen by Walrus

Eagles portrait
(Image credit: Getty Images/RB)

Formed in Los Angeles in 1971, the Eagles' musical output had come to define Californian rock by the time the decade was out. But more than that, it ended up defining the entire sound of the 70s – and much more beyond. 

One of US rock's most profoundly impactful bands, it's vaguely ridiculous that their back catalogue spans only seven albums – especially given the 50 years they've been a band. But within those seven albums, they've managed to create some of rock's most enduring tunes. 

With their ethos of 'song power' – a slogan they emblazoned over T-shirts and carried on to rock radio across the world – they merged rock, country, sweet surf and buoyant pop. When teamed with the creative powerhouse of Glenn Frey and Don Henley, they were an unstoppable force. 

That influence is still looming heavy over rock music today – not least in the work of Canadian psych-rockers Walrus. While upcoming album, Cool To Who, might not initially sound like it takes many cues from the West Coast rockers, listen to the dreamy, surfy guitar and infectious melodies, and you can hear the sun-soaked influences poking through.

Here, Walrus pay their dues, pick out their favourite Eagles tracks, and talk us through what they mean to them one by one.

Walrus press shot

Walrus in 2019

(Image credit: Outside Music)

I Can’t Tell You Why (The Long Run, 1979)

"Hands down the best Eagles song ever. This one is a karaoke go to of mine, I live and die in the Timothy Schmidt vocal range. Maybe one of the most tasteful guitar solos at the end of this song too. Spicy shit."

Take It Easy (Eagles, 1972)

"I mean, c’mon. When the harmony comes in, if you know the words you’ll be signing along to this absolute unit of a tune. And the lyrics – ha ha."

Take It To The Limit (One Of These Nights, 1975)

A Walrus classic – we’ve played to many an empty room all over the world, and on the lonely, sad drive home, we wiped our tears and blasted a little Take It To The Limit, and it somewhat healed our wounds.

Victim Of Love (Hotel California, 1976)

"I actually hate this song a ton, but there is something about it. I think I picked this one because there was no way I was going to pick Desperado."

Hotel California (Hotel California, 1976)

"I’ve seen the Eagles documentary more times then I will admit to anyone."

New Kid In Town (Hotel California, 1976)

"There's an old drive-in diner in Halifax called The Chickenburger and it has an amazing jukebox. This is my go-to every time I'm there... along with Monster Mash. It's one of my favourite Eagles songs. I've been pumping that machine full of quarters for years and just found out a few weeks ago that it's actually free."

Lyin' Eyes (One Of These Nights, 1975)

"We have played this venue in Sudbury (Ontario) a few times and have taken our chances sleeping in the basement after the show. The walls are filled with graffiti and in huge letters it says 'You can't hide your vagina eyes'. Every time I hear this song I think of that and am thankful that we didn't get bed bugs or bitten by a rat. Yet."

Witchy Woman (Eagles, 1972)

"If it's good enough for Elaine it's good enough for me. Waaaay better than Desperado."

Seven Bridges Road (Eagles Live, 1980)

"They didn't write this song but they bust it out live. Doesn't get more badass than starting a song with an a cappella five-part harmony section. There's a great scene in their documentary of them warming up backstage with this one."

Peaceful Easy Feeling (Eagles, 1972)

"I know the Dude hates this song but I think I kinda love it. I dunno. Lots of smooth ass guitar licks and 'Ooohs' on this one. Best to listen on an AM radio station in the car in the summer, with a big ol' spliff."

Walrus' new album, Cool To Who, will be released via Outside Music on October 18. Check out new single Played Out below.