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Tate plans to disappear

Former Queensryche singer Geoff Tate is planning to "disappear" when his last tour using the band name is over.

He recently made an out-of-court settlement with his former colleagues, who fired him in 2012 following a series of disagreements and violent episodes.

Under the terms of the deal, they’ll keep the name for good, while he’ll be allowed to call himself “the original lead singer of Queensryche” for two more years. In return, he gets exclusive rights to perform their two Operation Mindcrime albums live.

He’s continuing to use the name until his current live schedule is completed. The band featuring Michael Wilton, Eddie Jackson and Scott Rockenfield will have exclusive use of it from September 1.

Tate tells CJAM-FM: “It feels great, actually – really good. We never went to court; we managed to come to an agreement.

“So now, after two years, I know what I’m doing in the future, which is a great feeling. It’s very unnerving not to be able to put a plan together, at least for me, because I’m pretty goal-oriented.”

He’s promised to update fans about future developments in due course. But he currently has just one thing on his schedule.

“The farewell tour ends July 30 or 31. I’m pretty much going to disappear for a while, I think. I’m going to do some travelling. Going to go to Europe for a while. Pretty much that’s what’s on my plate at the moment.”

Geoff Tate interview

Martin Kielty

Not only is one-time online news editor Martin an established rock journalist and drummer, but he’s also penned several books on music history, including SAHB Story: The Tale of the Sensational Alex Harvey Band (opens in new tab), a band he once managed, and the best-selling Apollo Memories (opens in new tab) about the history of the legendary and infamous Glasgow Apollo. Martin has written for Classic Rock and Prog and at one time had written more articles for Louder than anyone else (we think he's second now). He’s appeared on TV and when not delving intro all things music, can be found travelling along the UK’s vast canal network.