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Wille & The Bandits have made the British blues-rock album you need in your life right now

When The World Stood Still by Cornish rockers Wille & The Bandits finds the band finding inspiration in closure

Wille & The Bandits: When The World Stood Still cover art
(Image: © Fat Toad)

Bandits singer Wille Edwards was night fishing on Cornwall’s Fowey River when he passed a silent Sawmills Studios and felt a flush of righteous fury at its imminent closure. 

When The World Stood Still is most likely the final album recorded at this institution, the frontman having hectored producer John Cornfield to run the tapes one last time. Perhaps because of that sense of occasion, it’s also, by some measure, the Cornish band’s best. 

From the title on, the pandemic lightly informs When The World Stood Still, with these songs channelling both the public spirit (the AC/DC crunch of In This Together) and the political slither (the tight funk of Broken Words, with its stuttering chorus, is an open swipe at Boris’s meandering lectern sessions).

But the Bandits are too vital to be bogged down, and as the music roams from the New York soul braggadocio of Move Too Fast to the John Martyn-esque whisper of Solid Ground – complete with gossamer Greeny solo – this is an album you sense will outlive its context.

When The World Stood Still is available from the Wille & The Bandits website

Henry Yates has been a freelance journalist since 2002 and written about music for titles including The Guardian, The Telegraph, NME, Classic Rock, Guitarist, Total Guitar and Metal Hammer. He is the author of Walter Trout's official biography, Rescued From Reality, a music pundit on Times Radio and BBC TV, and an interviewer who has spoken to Brian May, Jimmy Page, Ozzy Osbourne, Ronnie Wood, Dave Grohl, Marilyn Manson, Kiefer Sutherland and many more.