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Eagles top rock earning chart

The Eagles have been named the top-earning rock band of the year, grossing around $100m between June 2013 and June 2014.

Income from their History Of The Eagles tour put them ahead of Bon Jovi, Bruce Springsteen, Paul McCartney and the Rolling Stones – although rapper Dr Dre topped the list of all musicians with $620m and pop singer Beyonce came second with $115m.

But the Eagles were the only rock outfit to reach the $100m barrier in a year which industry analysts Forbes say has seen the continuing rise of dance and pop music.

Forbes report: “The History Of The Eagles tour helped the ageless rockers earn more than Lady Gaga, Kanye West and Miley Cyrus combined. The tail end of Bon Jovi’s Because We Can tour, which grossed a quarter of a billion dollars, pushed the New Jersey natives into the top five.

“In yet another tour-fuelled bonanza, the Boss justified his name, grossing more than $4m per night with the E Street Band.”

Income totals were calculated using figures from touring, record sales, publishing, merchandise, endorsements and other ventures. Management, agent and legal fees were not deducted.

Forbes’ top rock earners 2015

(entire music industry placing in brackets)

1 (3). Eagles: $100m

2 (4). Bon Jovi: $82m

3 (5). Bruce Springsteen: $81m

4 (8). Paul McCartney: $71m

5 (19). Rolling Stones: $47m

6 (20). Roger Waters: $46m

7 (28). Muse: $34m

Martin Kielty

Not only is one-time online news editor Martin an established rock journalist and drummer, but he’s also penned several books on music history, including SAHB Story: The Tale of the Sensational Alex Harvey Band (opens in new tab), a band he once managed, and the best-selling Apollo Memories (opens in new tab) about the history of the legendary and infamous Glasgow Apollo. Martin has written for Classic Rock and Prog and at one time had written more articles for Louder than anyone else (we think he's second now). He’s appeared on TV and when not delving intro all things music, can be found travelling along the UK’s vast canal network.