Thine: The Dead City Blueprint

West Yorkshire’s progressive rockers refuse to rush

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Thine don’t exactly rush their recordings. They like to give their music time to percolate and organically grow, which is why their third album comes 12 years after In Therapy. The wait has been worth it.

There are moments here that will have you reaching for your Paradise Lost or Anathema collections. Equally, they reach towards 70s cult prog heroes like Gentle Giant, as well into the wellsprings of Dream Theater and Cynic. But ultimately, Thine conjure up sounds and melodies that are very much their own.

You can hear the sedate majesty on Brave Young Assassin, Flame To The Oak and the brilliantly unpredictable Out Of Your Mind And Into A Void. Throughout, the five musicians lock together with an informality that leads to the feeling much of the music here has been created spontaneously. However, you also know there’s a discipline and structure intricately worked out.

The style is exhaustive, orchestral in a modern progressive metal style, yet also thoroughly absorbing. A darkly enticing work.

Malcolm Dome had an illustrious and celebrated career which stretched back to working for Record Mirror magazine in the late 70s and Metal Fury in the early 80s before joining Kerrang! at its launch in 1981. His first book, Encyclopedia Metallica (opens in new tab), published in 1981, may have been the inspiration for the name of a certain band formed that same year. Dome is also credited with inventing the term "thrash metal" while writing about the Anthrax song Metal Thrashing Mad in 1984. With the launch of Classic Rock magazine in 1998 he became involved with that title, sister magazine Metal Hammer, and was a contributor to Prog magazine since its inception in 2009.