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Phil Campbell And The Bastard Sons refuse to relent on We’re The Bastards

It's episode two of a bastard family affair on Phil Campbell And The Bastard Sons' We’re The Bastards

Phil Campbell & The Bastard Sons – We're The Bastards
(Image: © Nuclear Blast)

After charging out of the traps with up-and-at- ’em anthem We’re The Bastards, the Campbell family’s second album barely lets up until its halfway point with the harmonica-driven blues of Desert Song (echoes of Dark Days from their debut). 

True, there’s an acoustic guitar intro to fourth song Born To Roam, which eventually settles into something like down-home bluesy Americana, but it’s quickly back to type with Animals (one of three or four here that might have worked for Phil Campbell’s previous band, Motörhead). 

The superb Keep Your Jacket On proves that rocking fast and hard is meat and drink to the Bastards, and they often improve when angry, as on Bite My Tongue, the Pantera-like Hate Machine and even the punky Destroyed (liberally sprinkled with ‘Fuck you!’s). 

The so-so Riding Straight To Hell misfires, and curve-ball closer Waves could be by a different band, but Lie To Me (on which Neil Starr’s vocals soar over an unlikely mix of AOR stylings and a riff that Tony Iommi would be happy to claim) adds an unexpected twist to the unrelenting attack.

Freelance contributor to Classic Rock and several of its offshoots since 2006. In the 1980s he began a 15-year spell working for Kerrang! intially as a cub reviewer and later as Geoff Barton’s deputy and then pouring precious metal into test tubes as editor of its Special Projects division. Has spent quality time with Robert Plant, Keith Richards, Ritchie Blackmore, Rory Gallagher and Gary Moore – and also spent time in a maximum security prison alongside Love/Hate. Loves Rush. Aerosmith and beer. Will work for food.