Kayser: Read Your Enemy

Multi-hued Swedish thrash crew spice up their act

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If you love old-school Euro-thrash, Bring Out The Clown is going get you moshing. It’s one of the best, thrashingly mad tracks of recent years, yet it’s also just one strand of what makes these Swedes so stunning.

Led by one-time Spiritual Beggars vocalist Spice, Kayser are capable of complementing a powerful metal presence with the richness of guitar harmonies and the sort of tunefulness that would make even Boston gasp with admiration. This is obvious on the stoner-fuelled gallop of Bark And Bow, or the anthemic crack of I’ll Deny You.

On their fourth album, Kayser have a magical poise that maintains a manic thrust while allowing space for guitarists Swaney and Jokke to lock in with a lush groove. It happens on Dream Bend Clockwise, again on the title track and on Roll The Dice, while Almost Home offers complexity without ever sacrificing its basic instincts.

There are connections to the Beggars, but the chemistry here is very much about the five guys involved, and not about past musical paths. Read Your Enemy barnstorms, but it’s accessible too.

Malcolm Dome

Malcolm Dome had an illustrious and celebrated career which stretched back to working for Record Mirror magazine in the late 70s and Metal Fury in the early 80s before joining Kerrang! at its launch in 1981. His first book, Encyclopedia Metallica (opens in new tab), published in 1981, may have been the inspiration for the name of a certain band formed that same year. Dome is also credited with inventing the term "thrash metal" while writing about the Anthrax song Metal Thrashing Mad in 1984. With the launch of Classic Rock magazine in 1998 he became involved with that title, sister magazine Metal Hammer, and was a contributor to Prog magazine since its inception in 2009.