BFMV had to cut out constant partying

null

Bullet For My Valentine singer Matt Tuck has revealed their life on the road isn’t as rock ‘n roll as it once was.

On the current leg of the band’s world tour, frontman Matt Tuck and drummer Moose Thomas explained how excessive partying created a tense atmosphere in the camp, leading to the reflective tone of fourth album Temper Temper.

Matt tells Rockville in the video below: “There was a lot of stuff going on behind the scenes with me and the guys that was … it wasn’t ugly, but we started to drift apart for the first time in nearly 15 years. “It’s more just capturing the frustrations of those moments rather than anything else. It was almost like a little therapy session, without having to have therapy.

“We have our moments still. If there’s a reason to go crazy we will. But it’s more whenever the moment strikes rather than what it used to be, kind of every night regardless of whatever was happening.

“That kind of evolved into the making of Temper Temper and all the bullshit that went along with that. For the last two years we’ve been trying to keep it down as much as possible.”

But while life on the road consists mostly of video games and workouts for the Welsh group, they couldn’t turn down the chance to sample the famous Thai nightlife during the recording sessions for Temper Temper. The album was recorded in Thailand and, yes, the lads did witness a ‘ping pong’ show, but declined to go into too much detail.

Matt says: “It was cold and miserable in the UK in January so we thought, ‘fuck it, let’s go.’ We sampled the nightlife. We went out to a place called Pattaya and saw all the bullshit you’d wanna see…there was ladyboys and ping pong shows and all the crazy stuff. It was a bit grim and seedy and a bit smelly and stuff, but as far as an experience goes, it was fun.”

The band are planning a new album for early 2015, with Tuck vowing that fans put off by Temper Temper will be enticed back by the new material.

In the rest of the video, below, Matt and Moose discuss their knowledge of Polish metal, the differences in playing to festival crowds over smaller audiences, and how they chose BFMV as a band name over their early, much less serious moniker.

See the full interview here