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The 10 best thrash songs from 2000-2020

Power Trip
(Image credit: Will Ireland)

The story of thrash began in the early 80s and peaked at the end of that glorious decade. The history books tell you it came close to extinction in the 90s (even if that’s not strictly true), but it’s had a stellar resurgence since the turn of the millennium, with many of the scene’s biggest name rediscovering their original spirit and a host of next-gen thrashers pushing things forward. Here from 2000 right up to today.

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Destruction – The Butcher Strikes Back (All Hell Breaks Loose, 2000)

Audibly furious with themselves for wasting a decade, the reunited pioneers reclaimed territory on this wistful memoir – our first clue that the 00s heralded a new thrash Golden Age.

Kreator – Reconquering The Throne (Violent Revolution, 2001)

As soon as this explosive opener burst out of the speakers, we were all trying to wipe away tears, even as our heads were banging.

Exodus – Scar Spangled Banner (Tempo Of The Damned, 2004)

After helping Testament and Kreator renew their thrash vows, producer Andy Sneap worked his magic on Exodus's long-awaited comeback, blown up by this raging volley of anti-American attitude.

Municipal Waste – Unleash The Bastards (Hazardous Mutation, 2005)

These guys stuffed a firecracker up thrash's arse in the 00s, unleashing delicious garish, frantic crossover suckerpunches, like this flailing tale of mechanised warfare.

Slayer – Cult (Christ Illusion, 2006)

With the return of drum god Dave Lombardo, Slayer got their edge back, as trailed on this obsessively blasphemous advance cut (release date: 6/6/6).

Evile – Thrasher (Enter The Grave, 2007)

The Huddersfield hellions dropped jaws in 2007 with the strength and purity of this time-warped assault, upping the ante on the genre's revival.

Megadeth – Headcrusher (Endgame, 2009)

A whirlwind of thrashy technicality, Headcrusher was the best Megadeth single to drop since the early 90s, and Endgame cemented a return to the very top of their game.

Overkill – Ironbound (Ironbound, 2010)

Prolific hard-workers Overkill always kept up solid form, but in 2010 few expected anything as resoundingly powerful as this rugged, gleaming thrash masterclass.

Metallica – Spit Out The Bone (Hardwired... To Self-Destruct, 2016)

After decades away from thrash, the men who kicked it off were snapping necks again on this righteous riff labyrinth, closing their latest LP with spirited momentum.

Power Trip – Executioner’s Tax (Swing Of The Axe) (2017)

If any band represented thrash’s bright future, it was Texan terrors Power Trip. Like their illustrious forebears, Executioner’s Tax (Swing Of The Axe) combined the muscle and menace of metal with the fury and moral righteousness of hardcore. RIP Riley Gale.