Prog's Tracks Of The Week

null

Here’s some music that various members of the Prog team have been grooving to this week…

EDITOR - JERRY EWING

APHRODITE’S CHILD - *THE FOUR HORSEMEN*

Probably the best known piece from the band’s third and final album 666, which was actually released after the band had split up. A concept album about the revelations of St. John. The album was allegedly recorded under the influence of sahlep, a kind of Greek variation on coffee. Anyone who’s sat through the whole double album might be tempted to suggest it was recorded under the influence of something stronger!!

DEPUTY EDITOR - HANNAH MAY KILROY

OPETH - *THE GHOST OF PERDITION*

It’s Friday the 13th and we announced today that Opeth are the cover stars of the new issue of Prog, out next week – so I’m celebrating in suitably spooky fashion by cranking up this classic from their 2005 album Ghost Reveries.

ART EDITOR - RUSSELL FAIRBROTHER

THREE TRAPPED TIGERS - *13*

Wow Friday the 13th. Unlucky for some but not for fans of intelligent math rock fused in a progressive way with jazz fusion, intelligent dance music, toe tapping off-kilter electronic drum beats, swaying irregular atmospheric synths and snippets of a killer on the loose. You lucky, lucky…

NEWS EDITOR - NATASHA SCHARF

THE FEIRCE AND THE DEAD - *666…6*

This week’s track was a tough choice between the title number from Spooky Action and this one from the British post-rockers’ 2012 EP On VHS. In the end 666…6 scored just slightly higher on the creepy scale with its almost Tubular Bells-esque intro. And you can read all about The Fierce And The Dead in the new issue of Prog, which is out next week!

REVIEWS EDITOR - GRANT MOON

GENTLE GIANT - *BLACK CAT*

May this be the only one crossing your path today…

LIVES EDITOR - MALCOLM DOME

KEITH EMERSON - *INFERNO*

A perfect example of how a seemingly genteel, piano led performance can have an underlying sense of disturbance. The way Emerson unexpectedly plunges into jagging fragments adds to the uneasiness and lends the piece a forbidding atmosphere. Even without the visuals from the Argento movie, it’s somewhat eerie.