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Prog's Tracks Of The Week

Here’s some music that various members of the Prog team have been grooving to this week…

EDITOR - JERRY EWING

APHRODITE’S CHILD - *THE FOUR HORSEMEN*

Probably the best known piece from the band’s third and final album 666, which was actually released after the band had split up. A concept album about the revelations of St. John. The album was allegedly recorded under the influence of sahlep, a kind of Greek variation on coffee. Anyone who’s sat through the whole double album might be tempted to suggest it was recorded under the influence of something stronger!!

DEPUTY EDITOR - HANNAH MAY KILROY

OPETH - *THE GHOST OF PERDITION*

It’s Friday the 13th and we announced today that Opeth are the cover stars of the new issue of Prog, out next week – so I’m celebrating in suitably spooky fashion by cranking up this classic from their 2005 album Ghost Reveries.

ART EDITOR - RUSSELL FAIRBROTHER

THREE TRAPPED TIGERS - *13*

Wow Friday the 13th. Unlucky for some but not for fans of intelligent math rock fused in a progressive way with jazz fusion, intelligent dance music, toe tapping off-kilter electronic drum beats, swaying irregular atmospheric synths and snippets of a killer on the loose. You lucky, lucky…

NEWS EDITOR - NATASHA SCHARF

THE FEIRCE AND THE DEAD - *666…6*

This week’s track was a tough choice between the title number from Spooky Action and this one from the British post-rockers’ 2012 EP On VHS. In the end 666…6 scored just slightly higher on the creepy scale with its almost Tubular Bells-esque intro. And you can read all about The Fierce And The Dead in the new issue of Prog, which is out next week!

REVIEWS EDITOR - GRANT MOON

GENTLE GIANT - *BLACK CAT*

May this be the only one crossing your path today…

LIVES EDITOR - MALCOLM DOME

KEITH EMERSON - *INFERNO*

A perfect example of how a seemingly genteel, piano led performance can have an underlying sense of disturbance. The way Emerson unexpectedly plunges into jagging fragments adds to the uneasiness and lends the piece a forbidding atmosphere. Even without the visuals from the Argento movie, it’s somewhat eerie.

Jerry Ewing

Founder and Editor of Prog Magazine. Enjoys almost all progressive music in its many guises, but is especially partial to a slice of post rock.