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Deep cuts: Riches from the rock underground

Cover art for Yesterday's Children

Mean, lean and hairy acid rock for fans of such greats as Blue Cheer, Savage Resurrection, Euclid and Dragonfly, Yesterday’s Children were formed in 1966 by brothers Denis (vocals) and Richard (rhythm guitar) Croce. Hailing from the Cheshire and Prospect towns of Connecticut, they started out as a typically fuzz-driven garage-punk outfit, releasing their debut single, To Be Or Not To Be, in 1967.

By 1969 they had become a harder-hitting rock band, with elements of their grinding garage roots still to be heard. Sad Born Loser sounds like something Monster Magnet would have recorded on their seminal Spine Of God album over two decades later, while opener Paranoia is a glorious assault on the senses.

Album highlight She’s Easy has a lead riff that wouldn’t sound out of place on an early Motörhead or Tank album. Their charged rendition of Evil Woman is also worthy of a mention.

The production is raw and loud, with solid performances all round. As the heavy 70s were approaching, Yesterday’s Children, like many bands of the era, seemed to be plagued by being ahead of their time in terms of aggression, but somewhat behind it too, with 60s psychedelia still playing a prominent part in their sound. Unsurprisingly, the album didn’t sell well, and the band split not long after it’s release. These days it’s a a cult classic, of course.

Deep cuts: Riches from the rock underground

Deep cuts: Riches from the rock underground