Reptil - Throne Of Collapse album review

German industrial metal constructed from rusty parts

Cover art for Reptil - Throne Of Collapse album

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Freshly hatched and thoroughly pissed-off, Reptil emerge with a brooding track debut that aspires to channel mystical, ancient rituals and dark, multidimensional realms through their nightmarish industrial vision. In fact, the German metallers have created a wholly familiar, generic slab of early 90s alt-metal that bears more than a passing resemblance to Nine Inch Nails and Marilyn Manson. Trudging the well-worn path of whispered, creepy verses leading into ginormous buzzsaw choruses, Reptil dutifully employ every tool in the alt-metal drawer. At times it works. First single Soulride pounds along with a swinging, Rob Zombie-esque chug, but what Throne Of Collapse badly lacks is any hint of a memorable hook or massive shout-out chorus. The epic, seven-minute title track is a sprawling, slowbuilding industrial dirge that leads you round and round without ever getting to the big, fuck-off climax that the song so desperately needs. In this sense, Reptil are almost experimental in their defiant refusal to deliver something – anything – to hook the listener in. Throw on Pretty Hate Machine instead.

Hailing from San Diego, California, Joe Daly is an award-winning music journalist with over thirty years experience. Since 2010, Joe has been a regular contributor for Metal Hammer, penning cover features, news stories, album reviews and other content. Joe also writes for Classic Rock, Bass Player, Men’s Health and Outburn magazines. He has served as Music Editor for several online outlets and he has been a contributor for SPIN, the BBC and a frequent guest on several podcasts. When he’s not serenading his neighbours with black metal, Joe enjoys playing hockey, beating on his bass and fawning over his dogs.