Prog's Tracks Of The Week

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Here’s some music that various members of the Prog team have been grooving to this week…

EDITOR - JERRY EWING

CHRIS SQUIRE - *HOLD OUT YOUR HAND*

Forty years old today. Chris Squire’s wonderfully fluid and musically eloquent debut solo offering. It still sounds so far reaching in terms of vision. This is from the Old Grey Whistle Test, and that’s Patrick Moraz on keyboards and Bill Bruford on drums (God to have seen this live!). And Chris in what looks like one of Demis Roussos’s cast-offs. Just genius stuff the like of which we sadly don’t get to see on television these days…

DEPUTY EDITOR - HANNAH MAY KILROY

ANTIMATTER - *BLACK EYED MAN*

The latest album from Antimatter, The Judas Table, is another slab of their trademark melancholic rock, and this track in particular is equal parts mesmerising and eerie.

ART EDITOR - RUSSELL FAIRBROTHER

NAD SYLVAN - *COURTING THE WIDOW*

Although reminiscent of the ‘golden age’, this is no period piece. We join the “Vampirate” Nad Sylvan as he sets sail on a sea of classic prog, slicing through an ocean of Banks-like keyboards and Gabriel-esque flourishes with his own updated version of story-driven musical lushness.

NEWS EDITOR - NATASHA SCHARF

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REVIEWS EDITOR - GRANT MOON

MOTORPSYCHO - *STARMHAMMER*

I’ve been on a bit of a Motorpsycho jag recently, ever since their very first retrospective arrived at Prog Towers. Out now on Rune Grammofon, Supersonic Scientists - A Young Person’s Guide To Motorpsycho, marks the fact that they formed in Trondheim, Norway 25 whole years ago. So many styles, so much energy and creativity to what they do - it’s a real shame (if not a real surprise) that they’ve yet to catch on with what we’d have once called the ‘college radio’ crowd. Here they are at their most epic, with a tune from 2010’s Heavy Metal Fruit. Spacey psych, nice and grungey around the edges - happy weekend all…

LIVES EDITOR - MALCOLM DOME

POMEGRANITE TIGER - *OVATION*

This sparkles and fizzes with the influence of Goblin and Jean Michel Jarre. But just when you think you’ve got it pegged in the synth bracket, it twists into a Dream Theatre mode. The combination of striding guitar and keyboard airiness is irresistible, tuneful yet agitating.