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Shinedown: Threat To Survival

Florida’s melodic rockers uncover some depth

Often going under the radar, Shinedown albums always sell big time.

Why? The answer’s here on their fifth, and arguably best, release. The Florida four-piece might have roots settled in the nu metal turf of 15 years ago, but they’ve a flexible, deceptively simple sense of dense melody.

It’s ‘deceptive’, because while songs like Cut The Cord, Outcast and How Did You Love are catchy, they also have a sophistication that means you hear different nuances every time you play them. It’s modern pop rock, with flashes of funk (as on It All Adds Up), whipping rhythms (Dangerous) and darkness (Oblivion). You can hear nods towards Def Leppard and The Cars, but equally there are intensely melodic moments that will appeal to those who like a little more thrust.

It’s a highly personal album; the band have delved into the incidents and personalities that have shaped them. This is summed up by the two tracks that bookend the album. Asking For It is a brash entrance, while Misfits is a slyly rebellious exit. Threat To Survival is essentially Shinedown finding highly charged emotional depth.

Malcolm Dome had an illustrious and celebrated career which stretched back to working for Record Mirror magazine in the late 70s and Metal Fury in the early 80s before joining Kerrang! at its launch in 1981. His first book, Encyclopedia Metallica (opens in new tab), published in 1981, may have been the inspiration for the name of a certain band formed that same year. Dome is also credited with inventing the term "thrash metal" while writing about the Anthrax song Metal Thrashing Mad in 1984. With the launch of Classic Rock magazine in 1998 he became involved with that title, sister magazine Metal Hammer, and was a contributor to Prog magazine since its inception in 2009.