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The Who’s Pete Townshend shares that he used to be pansexual

Pete Townshend of The Who performs on stage at the F1 Grand Prix after concert on March 29th 2009 in Melbourne, Australia
(Image credit: Martin Philbey/Getty Images)

The Who’s Pete Townshend has revealed that in previous years, he thinks he would have identified as pansexual. 

In a column via British tabloid newspaper The Daily Star, the guitarist/singer opened up about his former sexual habits, revealing that he used to engage in sexual activity with anybody, regardless of their biological sex, gender or gender identity. Although he might not have had the vocabulary for it at the time, he now reflects that he would have identified as pansexual – the idea that you are attracted to a person because of who they are, not what gender they identify as.

When describing the meaning behind The Who’s 1966 single I’m A Boy, Townshend said “it’s the idea of masculinity and the way that men are seen to be at a time when I often forget, to be homosexual, to be pansexual, as I think I probably was, but not anymore.”

He continues: “But I think I was ready to fall into bed with anybody that would have me. I think I forget that homosexuality was still illegal, so these adventures had to be couched in vignettes of humour and irony.”

Recently, Townshend shared news of a potential upcoming new album with The Who. The rocker revealed that album is in the running for a post-lockdown release, if financial circumstances permit.

In talk with The Mirror, Townshend explained: “There’s pages and pages of draft lyrics. If the moment comes, I’ll go in and start.” 

Liz Scarlett
Liz Scarlett

Liz works on keeping the Louder sites up to date with the latest news from the world of rock and metal. Prior to joining Louder as a full time staff writer, she completed a Diploma with the National Council for the Training of Journalists and received a First Class Honours Degree in Popular Music Journalism. She enjoys writing about anything from neo-glam rock to stoner, doom and progressive metal, and loves celebrating women in music. '10 bands that rip off Black Sabbath but get away with it' is her favourite article she's written with Louder so far. When not writing, Liz enjoys various creative endeavours such as graphic design, as well as reading about rock’n’roll history, art and magic.