Skip to main content

Tracks of the Week: new music and videos from The Struts, Whitesnake and more...

Another week begins and we’ve listened to a dizzying amount of new music at Classic Rock Towers – all in the name of presenting you guys with the finest rock’n’roll riches we can uncover (and they are mighty fine, if we do say so ourselves). From jazz-handed pop rock through classic heavyweights, bluesy dudes and freaky shit, there’s something there for everyone.

You can vote for your favourite in our poll at the foot of this page, but first, here's a round-up of last week's most-voted-for, in reverse order.

3. Cormac Neeson - Broken Wing

2. Gorilla Riot - Half Cut

1. Tyler Bryant & The Shakedown - On To The Next

Congratulations to Tyler Bryant and co on a heartily won victory, and to Gorilla Riot and Cormac Neeson who scored healthy portions of the vote to come in second and third places. Have a spin of our victors, then get your laughing gear round these new guys and vote for your favourite...

The Struts - In Love With A Camera

Bursting away any Monday blues with more sparkly va-va-voom than Liberace, Freddie Mercury and the entire cast of Mamma Mia rolled into one, The Struts' new single gets this week's round-up off to a gloriously feel-good start. If you're already converted, you'll love it. If not, strap on your headphones, have a dance and get involved.

Royal Tusk - First Time

Meaty, hooky hard rock action now, with one eye on the radio but its heart in classic rock and grunge. Deep, metallic chugging riffs meet catchy vocals to assured effect. Catch 'em on tour across the UK with fellow Canadians Monster Truck this month – expect beer-throwing, air-guitaring good times aplenty.

Lovesick Radio - Bloodshot Eyes

Good times now with part Ohio, part Vegas-based rockers Lovesick Radio. The opening riff sounds a little like a more rootsy You Shook Me All Night Long, but in truth this is a more layered affair - in a good way. Punchy blue-collar rock'n'roll, rough-edged touches of punk, pop rock, bluesy guitar soloing... All audibly drawing from the classic rock likes of The Stones, Aerosmith and co. 

Whitesnake - Hey You...You Make Me Rock

As our daily newsfeeds descend into seemingly boundless levels of Brexit-induced what-the-fuckery, what we really need is to get as far away from the present as possible (mentally at least, if not physically). Enter Coverdale and co, who've come to take us back to 1987 with this catchy, oomphy cut from new record, Flesh & Blood. Hop on, tune in, raise your fists and be merry.

The Franklys - Illusions

London-based garage rockers The Franklys are on snappy, stylish form with this strutting, jutting piece of '00s guitar rock-nodding action. Trendy without losing its underlying sense of fun, it's the sort of music that'll make you feel cool and welcome. Check out more on their new EP, Framed, which is out now.

Novatines - Get It Together

British four-piece Novatines manage to capture a surprising amount in this punchy three minutes and 23 seconds of high-octane rock. The chorus vocals hint at Def Leppard. The guitar and melody veers somewhere between the Foo Fighters and more recent, alt kids like Spielbergs. And the whole package is wrapped up in a healthy appreciation for vintage guitar rock. Mmmm tasty...

Babe Rainbow - Morning Song

Now we take a left turn into wildest, weirdest Australia – the softer, sweeter end, that is. Lyrics about 'bunches of bananas', 'koalas', 'sleeping in the afternoon' and 'tuning into the raga' mesh delightfully with Tull-nodding flute and West Coast acoustic guitars. If it's all getting a bit much for you today, this is what you need. Find a beanbag (or just a really big heap of cushions), light a smelly candle and chill the fuck out.

Federal Charm - Can’t Rule Me

We'll leave you with the new single from UK classic rock revivalists Federal Charm. New frontman Tom Guyer is only 22 but commands like someone a good few years older, propelling their driving, bluesy gumbo. And that nifty little bridge guitar line sounds pleasingly like Sunflower by Paul Weller, which we like very much.