Live preview: Rich Robinson

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The former Black Crowes guitarist sets the scene for six one-man acoustic shows.

How do you like the discipline of playing solo and unplugged?

It was a little intimidating at the start, but I enjoy tearing everything down to its basic form. It’s cool to perform my songs on a more intimate level.

Your current solo album, The Ceaseless Sight, has a song called This Unfortunate Show that’s inspired by the difficult relationship you have with your brother.

Yeah. It’s especially difficult at the moment.

For twenty-five years rock writers have tried to get under the skin of those issues. What’s the nub of the problem?

It’s a difference of perspective, basically. Early on our musical influences were very similar, but as time went on his taste took a sharp left turn and the Grateful Dead became his one major influence. That wasn’t a place I wanted to go. Listen to what he’s doing now and it’s just… the Grateful Dead [laughs].

In January you stated that the Crowes have broken up, as opposed to going on hiatus again. Is that still the case?

We’re done. I really can’t see the band coming back.

That’s a great shame.

Yeah. I’m still very proud of being in that band. We could’ve done a great twenty-five-year [anniversary] tour and put a final nail into the coffin. But it didn’t happen, and that’s just the way it is.

What can people expect at your shows?

Maybe they’ll get some insight into the way I write, which is on an acoustic guitar. The only Crowes songs that I play are the ones I wrote; the focus is firmly on my solo material and some covers.

The first date is in Belfast on September 27.

Classic Rock 214: News & Regulars