Tracks Of The Week

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Join us as we stride with unerring purpose through rock’s bountiful orchard to twist six of the tastiest rock offerings from the vine…

CROSSFAITH – Wildfire
Skindred frontman Benji Webbe joins the Osaka electro metallers for this explosive track, taken from their 2015 album, Xeno. This four-minute song combines myriad genres with all the subtlety of a brick to the teeth and deserves repeated listens.

H2O – True Romance
New York hardcore punks aren’t known for their romantic songs, so this must be the most schmaltzy they’ve ever been – this video for True Romance from their Use Your Voice full-length features a torrent of snapshots of cute couples – all of whom are fans of the band and who sent their pictures in. Punk with a soppy side. Who knew? Gets you right in the feels.

BUCKCHERRY – The Feeling Never Dies (featuring Gretchen Wilson)
Taking a break from their high-octane riffola, Buckcherry have roped country singer Gretchen Wilson in for a reworked version of this country duet. It’s probably the most sweet song the California rockers’ arsenal, but don’t hold that against them. After all, we all need a little tenderness in our lives sometimes. Yes, even singing canvas Josh Todd.

RICKY WARWICK – Celebrating Sinking
The Thin Lizzy/Black Star Riders frontman has ventured out on his own recently, and his forthcoming album – the epically titled When Patsy Cline Was Crazy (And Guy Mitchell Sang the Blues) – features this gem of a rock’n’roll anthem that’s all about love, loss and redemption.

JOHN CARPENTER – Distant Dream
Who doesn’t love all those self-composed themes that director John Carpenter uses in his horror films? This is one that didn’t make it, but it’s hard to understand why – it’s creepy, terrifying and intense in equal measure. Taken from the veteran movie maker’s second album of lost themes – Lost Themes II – it might even rival famous Halloween soundtrack.

TOM WAITS – The Soul Of A Man
A new Tom Waits song is always cause for celebration, even if, as in this case, it’s a cover. Taken from God Don’t Never Change: The Songs Of Blind Willie Johnson, a tribute to the legendary bluesman, Waits has stamped – or perhaps stomped – his own eccentric and distinctive mark onto the tune, but kept the spirit of the original very much alive.